5 Simple Steps To A High-Quality Webinar Studio

Pim
Written by
- 6 min read

How many times have you joined an online session with shitty audio? Or hideous video quality that makes you want to leave instantly? The answer probably is "way too often". Especially now, while most of us are working remotely. To solve that familiar frustration, I will share 5 quick, easy and inexpensive steps to upgrade your setup. We did it - and I can tell you - it makes all the difference in the world.

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Before the corona pandemic, most of our client work took place at their sites. One week in each month we travelled to somewhere in the world to run workshops, give presentations, and work with companies overhauling their outdated structures. Then came the travel ban. Now we run all our sessions online.

But our equipment was in desperate need of an upgrade. We wanted to stand out not just in terms of content, but also in terms of quality.

Here is what we did.

Inspired by gaming

I started by researching the gaming scene. On YouTube I found a heap of useful information from gaming streamers. While they play video games, they set up live streams (mostly on Twitch) so followers can watch them play. Not really my cup of tea, but useful for creating a great online studio.

It taught me 5 steps to create a great video-conferencing studio. In order of importance:

1. Internet

Start with proper internet. Even if you have a great camera and good microphone, if your internet is not 100% your quality will still be mediocre at best.

Instead of using WiFi, move to cable. WiFi is not stable enough for such sessions. If your laptop does not have an ethernet port, grab a cheap convertor so you can plug it into USB-C or similar.

2. Audio

Good audio with bad video is way better than bad audio with good video. So, invest in a decent microphone. We got ourselves a Blue Yeti microphone that works well. It cost around €140. If you want to add a microphone arm to it (which we did) add another €70.

Not much for sound that is at least 10 times better. You can go for cheaper, but I would not recommend that. You can also go for a much more expensive microphone, but unless you are running a podcast series, I would not recommend that either.

Depending on your room, you might want to attach some acoustic foam to the walls. It will significantly improve audio quality if you can reduce echo as much as possible. Alternatives: furniture, curtains, carpet, etc.

3. Video

Upgrading your video: There are options for different budgets.

If you are looking for a cheap solution, get yourself a good webcam. Most built-in webcams are crap. Invest a few bucks in a better one. The ones most often recommended in the videos I watched are the Logitech C920 (~€110) or - slightly more expensive - the Logitech Brio (~€240). If you combine them with good lighting, you will get a lot of value for a small investment.

A higher quality solution is to work with a DSLR camera. I did not know this, but you can turn many DSLR cameras into webcams. All you need is a so-called capture card. It converts the image from your camera to your laptop and automatically functions as a webcam. No other software required.

We got the Elgato Cam Link 4K which costs around €160 and works like a charm.

If you have a DSLR camera there is a good chance you can use that. Check compatibility with various cameras here. Other recommended streaming cameras are the Sony a5100 (~€430) or the Canon 250D (~€550). We bought the Canon as we already had some Canon lenses. The image is super clear. It has autofocus, and is super easy to use.

One thing you want to add is a dummy battery. This allows the camera to be continuously powered—so it will not shut off halfway through your conference call. And, be sure to get an HDMI cable to connect your camera to your capture card.

(After running quite a few online sessions, we're now upgrading the studio. We're adding multiple camera angles and a 'live production switcher' to create an even more professional setting. Subscribe to our YouTube channel to receive updates.)

4. Lighting

It does not make sense to spend hundreds of Euro on a good camera and not have good lighting. If you don't light properly, all that potential is wasted.

So, get a three-point lighting kit. We got one for around €100. One lights you from the front left, another from the front right, plus one from the back (left or right). Search on 'three-point lighting setup' on YouTube and you'll see how it works.

If space is limited, you can get yourself a 'ring light'. It is a single light that lights your face and is a suitable alternative.

5. Background

In the background, we embraced the fuse boxes that are everywhere in our office. We painted the wall for more atmosphere, and added some LED lights for color. And, we got a background stand with a collection of colored paper to be able to switch the background occasionally.

Not a must-have, but a nice-to-have.

Here is what it looks like:

Finding your setup

Finding the right setup obviously depends on your needs. If you run regular remote sessions—as we do—it makes sense to invest enough to get a decent setup. But even with a limited budget, there are great options. For just a few hundred dollars, you can get a setup that will set you apart from 99% of the others.

To companies around the world: make this investment! It pays off instantly. It helps teams to run better meetings. It allows companies to significantly improve their communication. And it looks so much better when you work with customers and suppliers. It is a no-brainer.

What are your thoughts? Any tips to add to this list? What helped you most in terms of setup?

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Replies (8)

Leif

Leif

Thanks Pim for sharing!

What is your key learnings from having on-line workshops compared with on-site workshops? Will you go back to on-site workshops fully when it is possible or do you forsee that you will have a mix in your offerings?

Kind regards

Leif
Ps I really enjoyed reading your book Ds

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Pim

Pim

We'll probably stick with a mix of both. I found that in some settings online works better then offline.

It's extremely helpful that in such online settings you can bring people together very easily. Especially in large organizations (where people tend to be busy with meetings and all kinds of other obligations) we've noticed that it's a lot easier to get a diverse group of staff at the table. Also, for ongoing support such online sessions are easy because we can just quickly tune in and let them go out on their own again.

But nothing beats a physical session and the deeper conversations that can be had. Especially when you're working with a larger group towards one outcome.

So I guess (and hope) it will be a mix of both. What are your experiences?

Thanks Pim for sharing!

What is your key learnings from having on-line workshops compared with on-site workshops? Will you go back to on-site workshops fully when it is possible or do you forsee that you will have a mix in your offerings?

Kind regards

Leif
Ps I really enjoyed reading your book Ds

Leif

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John

John

Bravo!

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Leif

Leif

I share your view. I think it will take some time before we can have equal efficient and creative workshops/brainstorming on-line as on-site.

Leif

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Neil

Neil

Thanks for sharing this! Lots of helpful tips.

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Pim

Pim

Glad to hear. Latest update: just ordered a BlackMagic Atem Mini and new camera to have multiple camera angels. For multi-person sessions, more professional look, and interview settings.

Will share the result once it's ready to go.

Thanks for sharing this! Lots of helpful tips.

Neil

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Ralph

Ralph

Your set-up looks great Pim and I wonder what the future holds for video conferencing rooms in businesses. They certainly don't look as crisp as your set-up! I have just started painting the walls of my new studio and will certainly be adding some of your tips. Thanks for sharing.

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Rutger

Rutger

Thanks for this inspiring blog post! It helped me greatly in the decision to go with a better setup. One question: I've got a Blue Yet and just ordered the Atem Mini Pro + Sony A5100. How do I get the USB audio from the BY in the mix? a5100 doesn't take USB.

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